Mammals
 
Mammals

The natural tropical forest of Jerangau consists mainly of selectively logged hill dipterocarp and lowland dipterocarp forests at altitudes of 20–538 m a.s.l that receive an average total annual rainfall of c. 2,000 mm. In 2000, two melanistic tapirs were observed during a study of tigers in the Jerangau PRF; while six species of wild cats in five genera: tiger Panthera tigris, leopard Panthera pardus, clouded leopard Neofelis nebulosa, leopard cat Prionailurus bengalensis, golden cat Catopuma temminckii and marbled cat Pardofelis marmorata were recorded during a study to describe the diversity of wild felids. 

Tapirs

The animal is easily identified by its markings, most notably the light-colored “saddle” which extends from its shoulders to its rump. The rest of its hair is black, except for the tips of its ears which, as with other tapirs, are rimmed white. This pattern is for camouflage: the disrupted coloration makes it more difficult to recognize it as a tapir, and other animals may mistake it for a large rock rather than a form of prey when it is lying down to sleep. 

Malayan Tapirs grow to between 6 and 8 feet (1.8 to 2.4 m) in length, stand 3 to 3.5 feet (90 to 107 cm) tall, and typically weigh between 550 and 700 pounds (250 to 320 kg), although they can weigh up to 1,100 pounds (500 kg). They are primarily solitary creatures, marking out large tracts of land as their territory, though these areas usually overlap with those of other individuals. Tapirs mark out their territories by spraying urine on plants, and they often follow distinct paths which they have bulldozed through the undergrowth.

In 2000, two melanistic tapirs were observed during a study of tigers in the Jerangau PRF. The cause of this variation may be a genetic abnormality similar to that of black panthers that appear in populations of spotted jaguars. However, unless and until more brevetianus individuals can be studied, the precise explanation for the trait will remain unknown.

Tigers

The tiger (Panthera tigris) is a mammal of the Felidae family; the largest and the most powerful of the four "big cats" in the genus Panthera. Native to much of eastern and southern Asia, the tiger is an apex predator and an obligate carnivore. Reaching up to 4 metres (13 ft) in total length and weighing up to 300 kilograms (660 pounds), the larger tiger subspecies are comparable in size to the biggest extinct felids. Aside from their great bulk and power, their most recognizable feature is the pattern of dark vertical stripes that overlays near-white to reddish-orange fur, with lighter underparts.

The leopard (Panthera pardus) is an Old World mammal of the Felidae family and the smallest of the four big cats of the genus Panthera, the other three being the tiger, lion and jaguar. Once distributed across southern Eurasia and Africa, from Korea to South Africa, the leopard's range of distribution has decreased radically over time because of a variety of factors, including human influence, and the leopard now chiefly occurs in sub-Saharan Africa. There are fragmented populations in India, Indochina, Malaysia, and China. Despite the loss of range and continual declines in population, the cat remains a "Least Concern" species; its numbers are greater than that of the other Panthera species, all of which face more acute conservation concerns.

The Clouded Leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) is a medium-sized cat, 55 to 110 cm (2 ft to 3 ft 6 in) long and weighing between 15 and 23 kg (33 to 50 lb). It has a tan or tawny coat, and is distinctively marked with large, irregularly-shaped, dark-edged ellipses which are said to be shaped like clouds, hence both its common and original scientific name. It is found in southern China, the eastern Himalayas, north-east India and mainland Southeast Asia. The Bornean Clouded Leopard, Neofelis diardi, is a separate species found on the Sumatra, Borneo and the Batu Islands. Because of their distinct skull structure, the two species are considered sufficiently different to be the only members of their genus. The Clouded Leopard was a confusion to scientists for a long time because of the appearance and skeleton. It was what seemed to be a cross in between a big cat and a small cat. The scientific name of the genus, Neofelis, originates from neo, which means "new", and felis, which means "small cat", so it literally means new kind of small cat.

The leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) is a small wild cat of Southeast Asia. On average it is as large as a domestic cat, but there are considerable regional differences: in Indonesia the average size is 45 cm (18 in), plus 20 cm (8 in) tail, while it is 60 cm/40 cm (24/16 in) in the Amur region. The shoulder height is 41 cm (16 in) and the weight is 4.5-6.8 kg (10-15 lbs), similar in size to a Domestic Cat. The fur is also quite variable: it is yellow in the southern populations, but silver-grey in the northern ones. The chest and the lower part of the head are white. The leopard cat bears black markings that may be - dependent on the subspecies - spots or rosettes. It is usually a solitary animal except for the mating season. It has litters of 2 to 4 kittens and the gestation period can vary from 65 to 70 days.

The Asian Golden Cat (Pardofelis temminckii, previously been placed in genera CatopumaProfelis and Felis), also called the Asiatic Golden Cat and Temminck's Golden Cat, is a medium-sized wild cat (length 90 centimetres/36 in, plus 50 centimetre/20 in tail) weighing from 12 to 16 kilograms (26 to 35 lbs). In captivity this species can live up to 20 years, but its average lifespan in the wild is likely far shorter. While the fur is mostly foxy red or golden brown, black or grey colour variants may also be found. Normally, the coat is plain, save for some spots on the underside, and sometimes very faint spotting on the rest of the coat. However, in China there is a colour variant with leopard-like spots, which resembles a Leopard Cat. This spotted fur is a recessive characteristic, i.e. when a spotted and a plain cat interbreed, the young get plain fur.

The Marbled Cat (Pardofelis marmorata) is similar in size to the Domestic Cat, with a longer, more thickly furred tail, an indicator of an arboreal life-style, where the tail is used as a counterbalance. The weight is about 4.5 kg (10 lbs), 53 cm (21 in) and the tail is 45 cm (18 in). Its fur pattern is blotched and banded like a marble, usually compared to the markings of the much larger Clouded Leopard. In colour, the base fur ranges from pale yellow through to brownish grey with lighter under parts being a lighter variation.

The Marbled Cat is closely related to the Asiatic Golden Cats (Catopuma). It has two generally recognized subspecies, P. marmorata marmorata and P. m. charltoni.
Sky Bet by bettingy.com

Contact Us

Kumpulan Pengurusan Kayu Kayan Trengganu Sdn Bhd (56141-K)
Jalan Kalsium Bandar Bukit Besi
23200 Dungun
Terengganu Darul Iman

Tel: +609 833 7245
Fax: +609 833 7023

Email : info@kpkkt.com.my
General Manager
: suhairi@kpkkt.com.my

Others


 


 

You are visitor No:You are visitor No:294

Related Links